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Video - Boeing’s 757 : "terminated"

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The Boeing 757, first produced in 1981, and the largest single-aisle aircraft ever built, will not be replaced. This information was confirmed to the French international news agency (AFP), on 4th April, by Randy Tinseth, Boeing’s Marketing Vice President.

Randy Tinseth, Vice President Marketing - Boeing Commercial Airplanes

« It’s not planned. We will not bring the 757 back. There will be no replacement. It’s over. »

According to Boeing, the facts make the decision obvious ; the 200-seater single-aisle market, in which the 757 was previously positioned, is now 95% occupied by the 737 (MAX-9) and A321 (Neo LR).

So, it is one more page in Boeing’s history that is turning. During its maiden flight in 1982, the Renton (north western United States) based manufacturers, probably had no idea that they would produce more than one thousand 757’s over a period exceeding two decades, from 1981 to 2004.

With a range of 7,200 kilometres (4,500 miles), the Boeing 757, which was designed for medium-haul transcontinental and transatlantic flights, can accommodate 228-280 passengers, according to the version and cabin configuration. The 757 was also ecologically clean for that period ; the 757’s fuel consumption was 80% lower that of the Boeing 727 of the 1960’s.

The last manufactured 757 was delivered to Shanghai Airlines in late 2005. Today 700 aircraft are still in service around the world, notably with Delta Air Lines.

As for a new programme in the vacated niche, Boeing says that, together with their clients, they are looking at the possibility of developing a new aircraft, somewhere between the 200-seater 737 (MAX-9) and the 250-seater 787, although no decision has yet been taken.

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